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Western Area Water Supply Project

Western Area Water Supply Project

The oil boom in western North Dakota created a frenzy of industrial activity and economic development. The area’s infrastructure wasn’t ready for the boom and was inadequately sized to handle this extreme growth.

AE2S worked with local community leaders to develop the Western Area Water Supply Project (WAWSP), a regional water system that supplies drinking water from the Missouri River, supplemented with groundwater from the R&T Water Supply Commerce Authority (WSCA), to meet the municipal, rural, and industrial water needs for all or parts of McKenzie, Williams, Divide, Burke, and Mountrail Counties

Rocky Boy’s/North Central Montana Regional Water System

Rocky Boy’s/North Central Montana Regional Water System

The Chippewa Cree Tribe of the Rocky Boy’s Reservation and the State of Montana, through the Reserved Water Rights Commission, negotiated a settlement of the Tribe’s Water Rights Claims. The Compact, ratified by the 1997 Montana Legislature and signed by President Clinton in December of 1999, provided a water allocation of 10,000 acre feet to the Tribe from Tiber Reservoir, south of Chester, Montana

Watertown Municipal Utilities Water Treatment Plant

Watertown Municipal Utilities Water Treatment Plant

Watertown Municipal Utilities (WMU) administers the water utility within the City of Watertown, SD. Due to compliance issues with increasingly complex surface water regulations and concerns over elevated concentrations of disinfectant by-products (DBPs), along with the age of many components within the Lake Kampeska WTP, the continued use of the surface water became less attractive to Watertown

Fairmont Water System Planning and New WTP

Fairmont Water System Planning and New WTP

The Fairmont Water Treatment Plant (WTP) was experiencing treatment capacity limitations as well as challenges related to aging infrastructure, including operational difficulties related to deteriorating and outdated treatment processes. Proposed drinking water regulations would likely require improvements or advanced treatment processes to be implemented in the future at the WTP

Williston Water Treatment Plant Expansion

Williston Water Treatment Plant Expansion

The expanding oil and gas industry in northwest North Dakota strained water systems’ abilities to keep up with domestic and industrial water needs. As the economic hub of the region, the City of Williston continues to experience considerable growth, and it’s anticipated that the growth will continue. Exacerbating the domestic water demands are industrial water demands from the oil and gas industry within the region, estimated at over 40 million gallons per day (MGD)

Fargo Membrane Water Treatment Plant

Fargo Membrane Water Treatment Plant

The Fargo Water Treatment Plant (WTP) uses a combination of water from both the Red River and Sheyenne River, with the Sheyenne River being used nearly 40 percent of the time. Unfortunately, changing water quality in the Sheyenne River was challenging the City’s ability to utilize this important water source because it contains high salt concentrations, including sulfates and bromide, which posed a significant treatment challenge to the existing Fargo WTP

Pierre Water Treatment Plant and Intake Improvements

Pierre Water Treatment Plant and Intake Improvements

Currently, Pierre’s drinking water is obtained from a series of groundwater wells located throughout the city. Water is treated at each wellhead and pumped to storage tanks throughout the community.
In 2017, the City of Pierre began looking into treated water options following a community survey

Woodbury PFAS Water Treatment & Management

Woodbury PFAS Water Treatment & Management

In 2004, PFAS were first found to have contaminated drinking water supplies in parts of the eastern Twin Cities. Over the last 15 years or so, PFAS have been discovered in Woodbury’s groundwater supply, and research has been conducted to identify the source and level of contamination. Most of the contamination has been traced to four dumps or landfills in Oakdale and Woodbury, at the 3M manufacturing facility in Cottage Grove, and at the Washington County landfill

Grand Forks Regional Water Treatment Plant

Grand Forks Regional Water Treatment Plant

The new Grand Forks Regional Water Treatment Plant (GFRWTP) is a 20 million gallons per day hybrid water treatment facility that includes parallel conventional and membrane treatment processes that address key regulatory and water quality challenges, increased water demand, and logistical issues associated with the City’s prior 60-year-old facility

Thief River Falls WTP Optimization

Thief River Falls WTP Optimization

The Thief River Falls (TRF) Water Treatment Plant (WTP) experienced process upsets in early summer 2017 where the combined filter effluent exceeded 0.3 NTU in more than 5% of the total compliance samples, resulting in the WTP receiving three consecutive Notices of Violation (NOV)