A Picture is Worth a Thousand…Maps?

Wouldn’t it be helpful to have a map book that contains data about each feature as well as a photo to further corroborate the story?  What about the ability to bring the field indoors and make maintenance decisions from the comfort of your office? Photos of structures, signs, trees, etc. collected and attached to feature…

7 Career Tips from a GIS Pro

Last night, I had the pleasure of visiting a group of GIS students at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. After talking about some of the projects I have worked on at AE2S, I realized that everyone was really leaning in when I shared my tips for success working in GIS. It became immediately clear to me:…

A Cartographic Christmas

  Last year I enjoyed writing a post on fun ways to engage kids in thinking spatially around the holidays. You can revisit that post and learn how you can track Santa and see if you’ll have a white Christmas here. This year I decided to focus on finding a perfect location based gift for that…

No One Wants to Look at Your Ugly Map

Last week, I had the pleasure of attending at the WI Land Information Association Annual Conference. One of the topics that has interested me for a long time is how we as map makers communicate. And sometimes we say things we don’t mean to. Or we don’t know how to say the things we want…

GIS Day Contest Winner

Our winning entry is a representation of Cass County in North Dakota, and came from Kallie Dodds, the daughter of AE2S’s own Eric Dodds. Kallie, we love how you included both transportation and hydrography, not to mention important items like the airport (nice symbology!). Congratulations, and we hope everyone had a fantastic GIS Day this…

Improving Your Legend

ArcGIS always places a little symbol, called a patch, next to the text name for your layer. Did you know you can override the default to access a greater variety of legend patches that better communicates what your layer is?   In Legend Properties, make sure you are on the Items tab. Then just double…

Getting to the Point: Increasing Selectivity through Size and Color

It is often easy to get lost in a sea of data points. However, by utilizing different sizes and colors of points, you can create contrast which allows the reader to focus on a particular set of data.   Big thanks to our friends at Cartastrophe for inspiration and this great diagram: http://cartastrophe.wordpress.com/2009/08/14/way-over-in-british-columbia/Symbol SelectivitySymbol Selectivity…

Cool Map: Generic Terms for Streams

Do you call that water flowing past a brook or a stream? How about an arroyo? It actually may be telling of where you are from. Derek Watkins put together “Mapping Generic Terms in the Contiguous United States,” shown below, which gives insight into how culture and environment come together. He took the the place…